Tag: Beaconsfield Podiatrist

16/09/2016
Morton

What is a Morton’s neuroma?

The name Morton’s neuroma is probably known by many. It is the common name given to repetitive compression of a plantar digital nerve found in the ball of the foot. Constant pressure and irritation of the nerve by surrounding structures can cause a neuroma to form. The body tries to protect the nerve by increasing the thickness of the nerves insulating sheath.
A Morton’s neuroma commonly forms between the 2nd-3rd or 3rd-4th toes.

19/08/2016
Metatarsalgia – Ball of Foot Pain

Metatarsalgia – Ball of Foot Pain

So many foot problems can occur in our forefoot. As podiatrists we treat a wide range of problems associated with forefoot pain and deformity. Metatarsalgia is a non-specific term or general umbrella term if you will, for pain in the forefoot or ball of the foot. Discomfort is usually located beneath the balls of our feet and is typically a result of increased forefoot pressure. Bunions, hammertoes, short metatarsal bones, stress fractures, plantar plate disruption, Freiberg’s infarction, capsulitis, intermetatarsal bursitis and Morton’s neuroma area some possible causes of metatarsalgia. Today we are talking about intermetatarsal bursitis.

Intermetatarsal bursitis

What is bursitis? 

An inflammation or irritation of the bursa. A bursa is a small fluid-filled sac that provides cushioning and reduces friction, between and around the joints of the forefoot. Irritation of the bursa can cause swelling and pain (bursitis). The intermetatarsal bursae are located on the bottom of the foot near the base of the toes. Bursitis can also affect other parts of the body – back of the heel/Achilles tendon, the knee, hip, shoulder and elbow.

How did I get this? 

Generally, bursitis can occur through injury or repetitive motion causing irritation and inflammation.

14/07/2016
fungal toenails

The battle of the fungal nail!

  Fungal toenails or onychomycosis is common, unpleasant and persistent in nature. Accounting for almost half of all nail problems, this slow growing infection occurs when microscopic fungi gain entry to the nail, usually through small trauma. Trauma allows the pathogen to enter the nail and nail bed.        

Other causes 

  • Fungal organisms grow and spread in warm, moist environments and are usually picked up in warm damp areas like socks, shoes, public pools, gyms and showers.
  • Not drying off the feet thoroughly following showers or exercise and wearing tight shoes or socks, can provide conditions the fungus needs for growth.
  • People who have a compromised immune system, diabetes, circulatory problems and the elderly are particularly susceptible.

 

Symptoms

Fungal nail infections are contagious and can often spread from skin to nails. The poor cosmetic appearance that usually develops can cause some embarrassment. Nails can become discoloured, thickened, brittle, rough and weaken. Sometimes the infection can occur with an odour and can cause discomfort.  

Types of Onychomycosis

Distal subungual onychomycosismost common form of fungal nail that can cause the nail to become yellow br

11/07/2016
Diabetes

Understanding the need to look after your feet when you have diabetes

 

What is diabetes?

The pancreas is no longer able to make insulin, or the body cannot make good use of the insulin it does produce. Insulin enables glucose (sugar), from the food we eat to pass from the blood stream into the cells in the body to make energy. Not being able to produce insulin or use it effectively can cause raised sugar levels (hyperglycaemia). Over the long-term high sugar levels can damage some tissues and organs in the body. Type 1 diabetes is usually caused by an auto-immune reaction where the body’s defence system attacks cells that produce insulin. It can occur at any age, however it is more common in children or young adults. Injections of insulin to control sugar levels in the blood is required. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body is no longer using insulin efficiently. Sugar builds up in bloodstream and the cells are starved of energy. There may be a family history to developing type 2 diabetes or environmental triggers.

Diabetes and the feet come hand in hand (or foot in foot).

 

Every year, more than 4,400 amputations are carried out as a result of diabetes

26/05/2016
Cold Feet
Those of us who experience cold feet know they can be troublesome and uncomfortable and at times can stop you sleeping at night. Cold feet mostly affect us in winter months and in some cases
can lead to chilblains and poor healing, it can be more problematic as we age due to a decrease in circulation.
The simplest reason is a lack of warmth. Cold temperatures can cause constriction (narrowing) of blood vessels in our limbs, decreasing the flow of blood to our extremities. In absences of chilly weather other internal factors may be leading to our cold feet.
Raynauds Disease, Lupus, Neuropathy, Anemia, Diabetes, and Poor circulation are some common conditions that can also lead to cold feet.
Prevention is best by avoiding activities and habits that restrict circulation.