Tag: podiatrist Warragul

01/11/2018

Walking and Running

  Did you know that daily walking and/or running are some of the most important steps in reducing your risk of heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis and many other serious health conditions?   You may be wanting to improve your well-being, or reduce your risks of health conditions, or simply to start a new hobby, so here are some easy steps to begin your walking/running routine!

  1. Set realistic targets and goals. This could be a walking/running distance, weight loss (in combination with good diet), or seeing if you can improve your time running around the block.
  2. Ensure you have the most appropriate shoes possible by seeing a Podiatrist, who can also help you plan your walking/running sessions.
  3. Start off easy. This could mean a short walk around the block, or a light jog to the milkbar and back. Everyone is different, so do what works for you.
  4. Set a routine. Put a particular time aside each day for your exercise, and stick to it!
  5. If you’re feeling lonely, invite your partner, friend, colleague to exercise with you!
  6. Don’t feel bad if you have to skip a day, just stay positive and look forward to the next session!
  7. Make sure you’re having fun! Yes, you will get tired and sweaty, but if take notice of your surroundings, play some music and smile, you are on your way to making a

01/11/2018

Skin Cancer on the Foot?

As Podiatrists we often see moles and spots on people’s feet and toes. Most of the time they’re harmless, however occasionally we come across some that need further investigation. This isn’t to scare you, but simply to inform you of the importance of checking your feet, even though they may not get exposed to direct sunlight. It is true that skin cancers can form even where the sun don’t shine!   So what can you do?

  • Check your feet every so often for moles and spots.
  • Observe for any changes in size, shape or colour.
  • Apply sunscreen to your feet when not wearing closed shoes.
  • See your GP if you’re worried about a spot, or just want a professional opinion.

  Rest assured, if you’re seeing one of us we will make sure to keep an eye on the spots you may have on your feet, and monitor them as we see you into the future.   For further foot advice, visit our website and make an appointment to see one of our friendly Podiatrists!   http://www.thepodiatrygroup.com.au/booking/

29/08/2017

Ankle sprains are one of the most common leg injuries that podiatrists treat every day. You can twist an ankle during sport, at work or just minding your own business at home. Whether you have twisted an ankle for the first time or the 10th time, it is a good idea to book an appointment with your podiatrist.     We can help you from start to finish. From a thorough assessment of the damage to the ankle to getting you back on your feet and doing what you love best.     Assessment of ankle sprains is very important, as there may be very little damage to the structures in the ankle or there can be a complicated bone fracture requiring urgent attention. For this reason, your podiatrist may need to refer you for ultrasound or x-ray imaging. Depending on the severity, we may cast the ankle or fit you with a moonboot. If the sprain is minor, a good supportive pair of runners may be recommended.    Once an ankle sprain is h

29/08/2017

  As the clouds (eventually) start to clear we are reminded that Spring is upon us. It’s time to dust off those runners, get outside and start enjoying a bit of sunshine. If your runners are looking a little bit too dusty or your feet are feeling sore or fatigued when wearing them, it may be time for an update.     At The Podiatry Group, we can perform a biomechanical assessment of your feet. We look at your foot posture and your gait (the way you walk) to determine which type of runner would suit you best. Many people aren’t aware that runners should be replaced every 6-12 months if you have a relatively active lifestyle. The reason for this is that the structure of the shoe wears away over time and use, and the foam of the shoe compresses. A new pair of runners is often all you need to get that spring back in your step.    If you have got supportive footwear already but do find your feet and legs feel sore or fatigued, our assessment can help determine other factors that might be contributing to your pain. We can look at your activity levels and training/work surfaces to build an exercise

16/09/2016
Morton

What is a Morton’s neuroma?

The name Morton’s neuroma is probably known by many. It is the common name given to repetitive compression of a plantar digital nerve found in the ball of the foot. Constant pressure and irritation of the nerve by surrounding structures can cause a neuroma to form. The body tries to protect the nerve by increasing the thickness of the nerves insulating sheath.
A Morton’s neuroma commonly forms between the 2nd-3rd or 3rd-4th toes.

11/07/2016
Diabetes

Understanding the need to look after your feet when you have diabetes

 

What is diabetes?

The pancreas is no longer able to make insulin, or the body cannot make good use of the insulin it does produce. Insulin enables glucose (sugar), from the food we eat to pass from the blood stream into the cells in the body to make energy. Not being able to produce insulin or use it effectively can cause raised sugar levels (hyperglycaemia). Over the long-term high sugar levels can damage some tissues and organs in the body. Type 1 diabetes is usually caused by an auto-immune reaction where the body’s defence system attacks cells that produce insulin. It can occur at any age, however it is more common in children or young adults. Injections of insulin to control sugar levels in the blood is required. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body is no longer using insulin efficiently. Sugar builds up in bloodstream and the cells are starved of energy. There may be a family history to developing type 2 diabetes or environmental triggers.

Diabetes and the feet come hand in hand (or foot in foot).

 

Every year, more than 4,400 amputations are carried out as a result of diabetes

08/12/2015
Children

 

Children can often wear out shoes very quickly, scuffing the soles of the shoe, buckling shoes, fraying seams, wearing down linings or pulling soles apart. This may be caused by incorrect fitting or cheap shoes but may also be an indication of a weak or misaligned foot posture.

 

The Podiatry Group’s top tips for buying children’s shoes:

  – Make sure to have both feet measured as one foot can be a different size compared with the other. This can be in length or width. – Look for shoes with a straight last (the shape of the shoe better observed by looking at the sole- make sure the sole isn’t too curved around the toes) – Ensure there is good fixation; avoid slip on shoes. Laces and velcro hold the foot in the shoe more effectively. – Soles made of rubber and stitching that is doubled around the toe region can help increase the life of the shoe. – Don’t buy or use second hand shoes. These shoes have already been worn to fit the previos wearer and will already have moulded to the previous pair of feet. This can cause more harm to your child’s foot. – Ensure the shoe has a stiff heel counter; press on the back of the shoe behind the heel, make sure it can withstand the pushing and does not simply fold over when pushed. (Soft heel counters are okay in infant footwear). – There should be room at the front of t

30/10/2015
Diabetes TPG

Now Hiring- Podiatry Position Available

  The Podiatry Group have a part-time Podiatry position available.   Join our team of podiatrists and work in a fun and supported environment! We operate over 3 sites spanning from the South Eastern Suburbs to Gippsland. We are seeking a motivated podiatrist who is interested in working in private practice with a strong focus on biomechanics, paediatrics and general/diabetes care. You must be reliable, motivated and have a positive attitude. We are offering part time initially with the opportunity to expand to full time. We offer professional development and mentoring. You must be willing to travel across multiple sites. If you are a new graduate looking for an exciting career in podiatry then contact us now.   Contact us on (03) 5624 3880 or email your CV to admin@thepodiatrygroup.com.au

21/10/2015
CAM Walker

Cam Walkers/Moon Boots

  A Cam Walker is designed to help injuries heal, these can include soft tissue and bony injuries. The Podiatry Group have qualified Podiatrists specifically trained to fit Cam Walkers/Moon Boots. We are able to offer same day fitting at our Warragul, Drouin and Cranbourne Podiatry Clinics, this way you will be able to begin the healing process sooner.   The benefit of a CAM Walker is that unlike a plaster cast, it can be removed at night when going to bed or showering. This is helpful as it can allow for some non-weightbearing movement at the ankle joint which reduces the risk of the joint becoming really stiff after prolonged periods in the boot. This also makes rehabilitation easier after the boot is finally removed.   A CAM Walker is mostly used without any other form of support like crutches. However, there are some injuries at the initial stages that will require a patient to use crutches in addition to a CAM Walker. We are able to fit you with crutches if the need arises.     Some injuries that may require the use of a CAM Walker include:

  • Fractures
  • Achilles Tear/Rupture
  • Plantar Fasica Tear
  • Stress Fractures
  • many more…

  Most private health funds provide rebates for CAM Walkers/Moon Boots when supplied and fitted by our podiatrists. &nb

18/09/2015

How to choose the right runner for you?

  Choosing a new pair of runners can be overwhelming. Sometimes we look at our old and faithful runners and think maybe they’ll last me another 12 months, they don’t look too bad? Think again. Runners will only hold up on average for 600-800 kilometres. So if you run around 5 kilometres, three times a week and do no other training in your runners, then they should last you approximately 12 months. However, if you do this amount of running as well as using them every weekend then there life will be much shorter.   At the 12 month mark a shoe often looks in good condition from the outside, but it is the midsole that we cannot see that begins to break down and lose support. The shoe’s ability to absorb shock and provide cushioning begins to deteriorate as the shoe gets older and more worn.   Once we have come to terms with the fact that we need a new pair of runners where do we go? The bright lights and fancy colours on the shelves in the footwear stores may mesmerise us for a moment but it is important to keep our cool and that we don’t just choose a shoe based on it’s appealing colours.   Even your favourite shoe that you have worn for the last season may have changed. It may have changed weight; some will even try to drop by 20 grams, it may have changed material and therefore support. It is im